Our Mission

Serving the community of orphaned and injured wildlife, the community of citizens bringing animals to our attention, and the community of wildlife rehabilitators seeking education and support.

History of Wildlife Rehabilitation & Release

Wildlife Rehabilitation & Release, Inc. was created in 1994 by group of wildlife rehabilitators who saw the need to create an organization to handle the intake and distribution of the wild animals that the Animal Humane Society (AHS) in Golden Valley had been taking in for over 30 years. From 2002 to 2015 WRR helped directly support the care of thousands of wild animals annually admitted to AHS’ wildlife exam room through financial support, rehabilitator placement, rescue, and expertise. After AHS discontinued their wildlife program, WRR refocused our mission on support to independent wildlife rehabilitators through trainings and education, support programs such as Formula and Veterinary Reimbursement, distributing supplies; and community outreach and orphan prevention education. WRR continues to this day to recruit and train new rehabilitators, support existing rehabilitators, and educate the public about wildlife rehabilitation.

WRR Success Stories

Bambi’s Great Recovery

A DNR Conservation Officer and State Patrol Officer found a fawn with a broken rear leg. It was determined that the fawn had a complete fracture of his tibia which would require orthopedic surgery by a specialist. Michelle (a critical care veterinary technician and permitted wildlife rehabilitator) arranged for the surgery and assisted Dr. Scott Hammel, a Board certified veterinary surgeon, in the interlocking nail fixation procedure. The surgery was a success and the fawn was immediately transported while still under sedation to Kathy, a licensed rehabilitator who specializes in fawns. He was able to awaken in a safe pen in his temporary home. He made a rapid recovery while bonding with other fawns in Kathy’s care. His leg became stronger and stronger until he was successfully released to live his life with a new leg to run upon!

Purple Martins

Three Rivers Park District and the Purple Martin Conservation group maintain multiple houses for Purple Martin breeding. In French Park (Plymouth, MN) the Purple Martin house is suspended by cables. While they were lowering it to the ground in June 2012 to collect data, the cable broke sending the house and all its babies crashing to the ground. Madeline Link of the Three Rivers Park District brought 32 babies ranging in age from 2 days to almost fledged to avian rehabilitator Terry’s house for care. During the next two weeks Madeline replaced the nestlings in other existing martin houses – luckily the parents didn’t mind and took care of the new additions to their family. The Purple Martin Conservation group carefully maintains their records, so they were able to find appropriate nests to introduce the babies into with “siblings” the same age. A new house was built in the location of the fallen one and the adult Purple Martins began laying new clutches of eggs. The groups band all the babies just before they fledge the nest with both a state and federal bird band for identification.

Sucked-Up Squirrels

These 4 week old grey squirrels were vacuumed up when a homeowner was doing his spring cleaning. The squirrel nest of leaves and other yard debris was made in the rafters of a shed. During spring cleaning the homeowner used a shop vac to suck up the leaves and heard the thump, thump, thump. Opening the vacuum canister he found these three baby grey squirrels. Luckily there were no injuries beyond one having a bump on the head. They were successfully raised and released. They have settled in more appropriate housing in a squirrel nest box up in an oak tree.

photo of Loon

Loon-ey Storms

Amidst terrible storms that blew through one summer a unique and happy story came to light.  A call came in while the sirens were sounding on a stormy Sunday night, that a loon was found on a residential street in St. Louis Park. The public caught the loon, kept it safe from the weather, and then brought it in for rehabilitative care after the storms had passed.

Bambi’s Great Recovery

A DNR Conservation Officer and State Patrol Officer found a fawn with a broken rear leg. It was determined that the fawn had a complete fracture of his tibia which would require orthopedic surgery by a specialist. Michelle (a critical care veterinary technician and permitted wildlife rehabilitator) arranged for the surgery and assisted Dr. Scott Hammel, a Board certified veterinary surgeon, in the interlocking nail fixation procedure. The surgery was a success and the fawn was immediately transported while still under sedation to Kathy, a licensed rehabilitator who specializes in fawns. He was able to awaken in a safe pen in his temporary home. He made a rapid recovery while bonding with other fawns in Kathy’s care. His leg became stronger and stronger until he was successfully released to live his life with a new leg to run upon!

Purple Martins

Three Rivers Park District and the Purple Martin Conservation group maintain multiple houses for Purple Martin breeding. In French Park (Plymouth, MN) the Purple Martin house is suspended by cables. While they were lowering it to the ground in June 2012 to collect data, the cable broke sending the house and all its babies crashing to the ground. Madeline Link of the Three Rivers Park District brought 32 babies ranging in age from 2 days to almost fledged to avian rehabilitator Terry’s house for care. During the next two weeks Madeline replaced the nestlings in other existing martin houses – luckily the parents didn’t mind and took care of the new additions to their family. The Purple Martin Conservation group carefully maintains their records, so they were able to find appropriate nests to introduce the babies into with “siblings” the same age. A new house was built in the location of the fallen one and the adult Purple Martins began laying new clutches of eggs. The groups band all the babies just before they fledge the nest with both a state and federal bird band for identification.

Sucked-Up Squirrels

These 4 week old grey squirrels were vacuumed up when a homeowner was doing his spring cleaning. The squirrel nest of leaves and other yard debris was made in the rafters of a shed. During spring cleaning the homeowner used a shop vac to suck up the leaves and heard the thump, thump, thump. Opening the vacuum canister he found these three baby grey squirrels. Luckily there were no injuries beyond one having a bump on the head. They were successfully raised and released. They have settled in more appropriate housing in a squirrel nest box up in an oak tree.

photo of Loon

Loon-ey Storms

Amidst terrible storms that blew through one summer a unique and happy story came to light.  A call came in while the sirens were sounding on a stormy Sunday night, that a loon was found on a residential street in St. Louis Park. The public caught the loon, kept it safe from the weather, and then brought it in for rehabilitative care after the storms had passed.

Interested in rehabilitating wildlife?
Learn more about the permitting process.

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